Tag Archives: cooking

Sea Robins and Boneless Chicken

Eastern Sea Robin [Image: www.danasrig.top]

Eastern Sea Robin [Image: www.danasrig.top/]

The boneless chicken breast, a formless glob of translucent meat usually found under a window of cellophane, is a terrifying thing. It is the perfect representation of the American palate: Cheap, industrial, and nearly flavorless.

The meat’s formlessness leaves you unaware and unconcerned that it was once part of an animal, a small flightless bird that lived its entire life in a small cage without much natural light. It is completely lacking in anatomical markers beyond the word “breast.” You trust that it is a breast and not something else. Whatever it is, it seems to come from a limitless supply because it’s always there when you want it.

The boneless breast cannot be used creatively because creativity works though limitation and obstacle. With boneless meat the obstacles are already overcome. Being perfectly bland, it can accommodate a limitless variety of spices and condiments. It lacks the very things—blood, bone, marrow, skin, and fat—that would give it flavor and texture through the transformative act of cooking. The boneless breast is a ready-made object that is used in conjunction with other ready-made additives to become a meal. It is everything that is wrong about the industrial food apparatus.

A sea robin is the exact opposite. Being nearly all bone and covered in mildly poisonous spines, this ugly northeastern trash fish is the palatal antichrist to boneless chicken. In New England, it’s considered an overabundant nuisance fish that poaches bait meant for stripers. In fact, the robin is considered so unworthy a fish that fishermen refuse to acknowledge them in their catch. A Long Islander who catches 10 sea robins and one bluefish will tell you he didn’t get into the striper.

When my fishing buddy reeled in a huge robin, I plucked it out of the surf in excitement and got a half-inch spine lodged in my thumb. The wound hurt, but I was proud of it.  We were no doubt the only Long Island fishermen that day happily leaving the surf with a bucket of robins.

The first time I had sea robin was on a party boat out of Sheepshead Bay. It was fried and served on white bread with spicy mayonnaise and tomato. It was delicious. I couldn’t believe that this was the ugly red fish with the oversized head and bat wings that everybody scoffed at. When the captain decided to move the boat from our current location because we were hooking too many robins, my friend and I looked at each other in mild disappointment.

There are two paths available to us going forward this century: The sea robin and the boneless chicken breast. The path of the sea robin is about embracing what it is ugly, precarious, labor-intensive, and near; the path of the boneless breast embraces what is cheap, easy, and removed from the reality of our food practices. The robin, like any freshly caught fish, reminds you of the pleasure of standing on the beach and casting into the surf. Eating boneless chicken is a completely forgettable experience unless you get salmonella. The path of the sea robin is sustainable and forces us to partake in death and manage waste; the path of boneless chicken breasts leads to oblivion.

After the Hunt: Wild Turkey Recipes for Spring

Don’t wait until fall to devour that gobbler! These three wild turkey recipes are perfect for dining al fresco this spring. Looks like it’s time to fire up the grill.

Wild Turkey Mole

Courtesy of Jonathan Miles at Field & Stream

Wild turkey mole [Image Credit: Johnny Miller]

Image Credit: Johnny Miller

Mole originated in southern Mexico, and traditionally includes dozens of ingredients cooked over the course of many days. This recipe, adapted from Chicago chef Rick Bayless, is less demanding but still has so much of that traditional flavor. When grilling the turkey, remember not to overcook! This recipe serves 4. Leftover mole can be frozen.

Ingredients

  • 1 wild turkey breast, whole or split
  • 2 dried ancho chiles, seeded and stemmed
  • 2 tablespoon lard or vegetable oil, divided
  • ½ onion, sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 4 plum tomatoes, halved lengthwise
  • ½ cup dry-roasted unsalted peanuts
  • ½ cup roasted unsalted almonds
  • 2 slices white bread, torn into chunks
  • 1 chipotle chile with sauce from a can of chile con adobo
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 quart chicken stock, plus slightly more if needed
  • ¾ cup red wine
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 4 tablespoon cilantro, chopped
  • Salt & pepper, to taste

Directions

  1. Heat a skillet over medium heat. Tear the dried ancho chiles into pieces that will lie flat in the pan. Toast the pieces on both sides until they begin to crackle, but flip or remove them once they start to smoke. Transfer the toasted chiles to a bowl filled with hot water and soak for 30 minutes.
  2. While the chiles are soaking, heat 1 tablespoon of lard or oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is deep golden brown (about 8 minutes). Remove pot from heat.
  3. Arrange the tomato halves cut side up on a sheet pan. Place the tomatoes under a broiler set to high. Roast the tomatoes until blackened and bubbling, about 5 minutes, then flip tomatoes and roast the other side for the same effect. Allow the tomatoes to cool, then peel off as much skin as you can. (Some charred bits left behind on the tomatoes are fine and will add character to your mole.)
  4. Scrape the tomatoes and any juices into a blender, then add the cooled onion and garlic to the blender. Drain the ancho chiles, discard the water, and then add chiles to the blender. Add nuts, bread, chipotle, cinnamon and about 2 cups of chicken stock to the blender, and blend until very smooth. (Note: Stop and scrape down the sides of the blender to make sure all ingredients are blended. Add more stock as needed to yield a smooth, pourable puree.) Press the puree through a sieve into a bowl.
  5. Over a medium-high burner, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon lard or oil in the same pot or Dutch oven (rinsed and wiped clean). When the oil begins to smoke, add the puree and stir constantly for 5 – 7 minutes, or until the mixture has considerably darkened and thickened. Add the remaining chicken stock, wine, vinegar, and bay leaves, and reduce heat to low. Simmer this mixture, partially covered, for about an hour, stirring occasionally and adding more stock or water as needed to maintain a saucy consistency. Add salt and pepper along with a tablespoon of sugar, to taste. Keep the sauce covered while you cook the turkey.
  6. Allow the turkey to sit out covered, at room temperature for about 30 minutes before cooking. Light a medium fire on one side of a charcoal grill, leaving the other side open. (If you are using a gas grill, set the burners to medium on one side.) Rub the turkey breasts with olive oil, and generously salt and pepper them. Place the turkey on the grill, directly over the heat, and cook each side for about 5 minutes to brown it. Move the breast to the side without coals and cover the grill. The turkey is done cooking when a meat thermometer placed in the its thickest park reads 150°F. (The size of the breast and temperature of the grill will determine cooking time.) Wrap the cooked turkey breast in foil and let it rest for about 10 minutes. Gently reheat the mole as needed.
  7. To serve, slice the meat across the grain. Ladle the mole onto plates and nestle the turkey into the sauce. Garnish with chopped cilantro.

Grilled Wild Turkey Rolls

Courtesy of Something Sweet Something Salty

Grilled Wild Turkey Rolls [Image: somethingsweetsomethingsalty.wordpress.com]

Image: somethingsweetsomethingsalty.wordpress.com

These mouthwatering wild turkey rolls are so easy to make. They would make a great addition to any BBQ. Even the leftovers are delicious!

Ingredients

  • 1 lb thick-cut peppered bacon
  • 1 can pickled, sliced jalapenos
  • 1 1½ lbs wild turkey breast

Marinade:

  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ½ tablespoon white vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • ½ teaspoon ground pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced (or 1 teaspoon garlic powder)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, stir together ingredients for marinade.
  2. Cut meat into 1½-inch cubes. Add meat to marinade in bowl. Let meat marinade for a minimum of two hours.
  3. Cut each piece of bacon in half. Into the center of a bacon slice, place one slice of jalapeno over one cube of turkey. Tightly roll bacon over turkey and hold in place with a toothpick.
  4. After cleaning the grill, heat to medium heat (around 300°F – 350°F). Place rolls on sides and cook slowly, turning every few minutes. Since bacon grease will be dripping down, keep a spray bottle handy to chase away flare-ups. When the bacon is fully cooked, the meat should also be fully cooked.
  5. Remove cooked turkey rolls from grill and let stand for five minutes before serving.

Grilled Turkey with Greek Lemon Sauce

Courtesy of Martha Daniels at Missouri Department of Conservation

This delicious wild turkey recipe reminds us of the Greek street food, souvlaki. Just make sure to make enough – everyone at the BBQ is going to want thirds.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 lbs wild turkey, skin removed, cut into ¼-inch thick slices
  • 1 cup yogurt
  • 2 teaspoons fresh orange juice
  • ½ teaspoon minced garlic
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon orange zest

Directions

  1. In a medium-size bowl, stir together olive oil, 3 tablespoons lemon juice, 2 tablespoons oregano, ½ teaspoon salt and pepper. Add the turkey slices to this marinade. Cover and place in refrigerator to marinade for 30 minutes to 1 hour.
  2. To make the lemon sauce, mix together the remaining ingredients in a small bowl. Cover and refrigerate.
  3. When finished marinading, place the turkey on wooden skewers to help hold in moisture. Grill over medium heat until done, about 10 minutes or more.
  4. Serve skewered turkey with lemon sauce.

Summer of the Snapping Turtle

Image: commons.wikimedia.org

Image: commons.wikimedia.org

By Jack Kredell

One of the first things my grandfather told me when I went to visit him on the Abita River in Louisiana was that if I was bit by a snapping turtle it would not let go until it thundered. I was nine years old then, and in my imagination where the snapping turtle had taken hold with its vice-like jaws, it has yet to thunder. Many years later, after deciding with a friend to make use of the area’s abundant snapper population for turtle soup, I realized he was probably referring to Macrochelys temminckii, the Godzilla-esque alligator snapping turtle, and not the more diminutive common snapping turtle, which can be taken legally throughout the Northeast.

That summer the snappers were everywhere; we saw them splattered on roadsides, roving between water hazards on golf courses, and once, while fishing, I saw a turtle the size of a municipal trashcan lid dart out of the tea-colored depths and give chase to a hooked bluegill. That turtle, which we called King Snapper, became the turtle of our dreams, the turtle of legend against which all other turtles were measured. But we knew that King Snapper would not be caught, or if he was, it come at the price of our sanity and livelihoods, so we focused on small to medium-sized turtles (which were supposedly better for soup).

Catching snapping turtles isn’t as easy as it looks. They’re nimble swimmers and the moss that collects on their shells makes them hard to spot. Our early tactics were based on a series of Youtube videos that showed a guy waist deep in pond scum using a hiking staff to feel for submerged turtles. Armed with newly made turtle staffs, we trudged through the stream behind our houses, stopping every so often to prod the bottom for the knock of a turtle shell. We logged 15 to 20 hours of futility using this method. The closest we got was a set of turtle tracks that ran up a muddy bank. At least they were in the area.

In the meantime, our quest for turtles had become an obsession. We judged lakes, rivers, streams, ponds, and wetlands on turtle potential alone. In our new snapper-inspired lexicon things were either turtley-slow, shallow, murky, foul-smelling-or not turtley-fast-moving, rocky, trout infested. If we happened on a clear and fast stream while searching for the turtle gold of stagnancy and putrefaction, we might disdainfully overturn a rock or two before leaving it for some fly tyer to explore. It was useless to us if it didn’t hold turtles. If you could drink the water after boiling it once, maybe twice, it was not interesting to us. Turtle water will kill you. Turtles thrived in human poison. To get closer meant poisoning ourselves.

Or so we thought. As summer progressed we began to refine our methods. We traded in turtle staffs for less labor-intensive jug lines that we manufactured from orange juice and milk containers. We also narrowed down our list of turtle waters to a few nearby lakes and ponds. One of the more promising locations was a shallow, seasonal overflow pond adjacent a popular trout-fishing stream. When I went to scout it I saw a 20-pound snapper furtively slip into the water from a tree stump where it was sunning itself. This was the place. When I got home I called up my turtle partner with the news and we drove over to set up a few jug lines baited with chicken gizzards before it got dark.

Though smaller, the common snapping turtle is no less fierce than its bayou-dwelling cousin. They will claw and bite you if handled improperly. We rode our bicycles over the next morning and found that something had taken the bait. The first line came in without resistance; we found nothing but a severely misshapen 2/0 hook. Whatever was capable straightening a steel hook was an absolute brute. Was it the monster I had seen the day before? When I began to draw in the other jug, which had been pulled from the bank to the middle of pond, I felt the writhing tug of a turtle, and then horror; the mono broke above the leader. Panicked, I waded in to see if I could grab the turtle. The line was caught on a limb and next to it, facing away from me, was a 15 pounder snapping turtle. I moved in and snatched it by its tail. The search was over. I pulled the snapper from the water like a mad turtle baptist.

We put our prize in an army surplus backpack made of thick canvas and started for home. The feeling of the turtle raking my back with its claws as we cycled down the highway filled me with sadness, not to mention a sense of the absurd. I felt sorry for the creature strapped to its own death, struggling to make sense of its dark canvas cell. But I also looked forward to the idea of soup, and to wearing the shell as a breastplate after the apocalypse.

Turtles must be purged before you can eat them. This is done by placing the turtle in a large plastic container and changing the water every other day for two weeks. A turtle is considered purged when you no longer have to change the water after 24 hours. It is also recommended that you bleed your turtle out by cutting off the head and hanging it upside down in the shade for a couple hours. Then comes the hard part. Turtles are resilient – if not the undead – creatures who will fight the butcher’s hand long after the head is removed (I mean for hours). Butchering turtles is not like other animals because the shell restricts your access from the top. Meat must be cut out rather than stripped away with neat linear cuts. Nevertheless, in a few hours the turtle yielded 5-7 pounds of very fresh, clean-looking meat. The soup was incredibly delicious, which we made that evening with the help of my friend’s kids. We topped it off with a little sherry and ate it with a side of sourdough. We were amazed that such a delicate and clean flavor could issue from mud and muck. In terms of flavor the meat is somewhere between alligator and beef, without being as chewy as the former nor as tender as the latter. We were very pleased.

Later that summer, I went back to the lake where King Snapper lived to fish for bluegill. When I arrived I was greeted by a vast wasteland of sun-baked mud. Evidently the state couldn’t afford the repairs needed to fix the dam so the lake was drained. I walked over the hardened flats collecting bits of derelict tackle. The thunder had spoken and the summer of the snapping turtle was over.

3 Recipes for the Wild Game in Your Freezer

In the Northeast, it’s been nothing but freezing temperatures and snow, ice, and more snow. Naught to do but hole myself up in the kitchen and finally get to all the wild game I’ve got stocked in the freezer. Since there are so many recipes for cooking wild game, here are three favorites that I’ve recently cooked up.

Indian Butter Pheasant

Courtesy of Food for Hunters

My Indian Butter Pheasant came with a bit of birdshot [Image Credit: Jess Feldman]

My Indian Butter Pheasant came with a bit of birdshot. [Image Credit: Jess Feldman]

I love Indian food. So, when I saw this curry recipe, I knew I had to make it. Unlike other curry recipes, this one has ingredients you can find at any grocery store. Garam masala, a mixture of spices that can found in the spice aisle, adds a really nice warming element to the dish. I also liked that the curry is thickened with minced cashews instead of cornstarch. This recipe makes about four servings.

Ingredients

Marinade

  • 1 pound skinless pheasant breasts (and legs, if you want)
  • 1/3 cup plain yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon of peanut oil
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala
  • 5 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1 inch piece of ginger, peeled

Curry Sauce

  • 1 tablespoon peanut oil
  • 1 shallow, finely chopped
  • ¼ of an onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons butter or ghee
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon ginger garlic paste (leftover from marinade)
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ¼ cup plain yogurt
  • 1 cup heavy cream (or half-and-half)
  • 1 cup of tomato puree
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper, to taste
  • Salt & pepper, to taste
  • ¼ cup finely ground cashews
  • 4 servings of jasmine or basmati rice

Directions

  1. In a food processor or using a mortar & pestle, blend the ginger and garlic together to make a paste. Scoop out the paste and put into a small bowl. Add yogurt, peanut oil, salt, and garam masala to the ginger and garlic paste. Mix well. Reserve 2 teaspoons of this marinade mixture in a small Tupperware container and put in refrigerator. (You’ll be using this little bit for the curry sauce.) Put pheasant in a large ziplock bag and pour in the rest of the marinade. Refrigerate for 48 hours.
  2. Grill or broil pheasant pieces until browned on the outside. Don’t cook all the way through! The pheasant will finish cooking in the curry sauce. Cut breasts into bite-size pieces and shred meat of the leg bones. Set meat aside.
  3. In a large skillet or wok, heat 1 tablespoon of peanut oil over medium-high heat. Saute shallot and onion until translucent. Then stir in butter, lemon juice, the reserved garlic-ginger paste, 1 teaspoon of garam masala, chili powder, cumin, and bay leaf. Cook, stirring for 1 minute.
  4. Add tomato puree to skillet and stir for 2 minutes. Next, stir in 1 cup of cream and ¼ of plain yogurt. Add cayenne pepper to taste. Reduce heat and let the curry sauce simmer for 10 minutes.
  5. Stir in ground cashews. You may not have to use all of the ¼ cup, so just use a bit at a time, stir and decide if the sauce needs more thickening. If you’re sauce has gotten too thick, add a bit more cream or water.
  6. Add pheasant chunks to the curry sauce and heat thoroughly. I cooked mine in the sauce for about 8 minutes more. Add salt & pepper to taste to the curry sauce. Remove and discard bay leaf. Serve curry over rice.

Chipotle Pheasant Quesadillas

Courtesy of The Gift Fox 

Hen pheasant on a fence post [Image Credit: Jack Kredell]

Image Credit: Jack Kredell

I cooked more pheasant than I needed for the curry recipe above, so I had one cooked pheasant breast leftover. Pulling these quesadillas together is so easy, perfect for a weeknight meal. You should be able to find a can of chipotle peppers in adobo sauce in the Latin/Spanish foods section of the grocery store. This recipe makes 1 large quesadilla or 2 small quesadillas.

Ingredients

  • 1 pheasant breast, cooked
  • 2 – 3 chilis from a can of chipotle peppers in adobo sauce
  • 1/3 can of black beans, rinsed
  • 2 large flour tortillas (or 4 small soft taco shells)
  • 1 cup sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
  • Sour cream and salsa, for serving (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. On the stovetop, add 1 tablespoon of olive oil in cast iron skillet. Heat oil over medium-low heat.
  2. Shred pheasant and add to heated skillet. Add chilis to skillet.
  3. With a wooden spoon, stir together chilis and pheasant so pheasant is covered in chipotle flavoring. Cook pheasant until warmed through, about 5-7 minutes. Make sure to heat through on low heat, so you don’t dry out the meat.
  4. Place tortilla (or soft taco shells) on large baking sheet. Whether you are making just one large quesadilla or two smaller ones, layer the ingredients. On the bottom layer, spread out a ½ cup or so of the shredded cheese. Over that, add the black beans, followed by the chipotle pheasant. Sprinkle the rest of the shredded cheese over the pheasant, and then top with the other tortilla.
  5. Put quesadillas in oven and bake for 10 minutes or so, just until the cheese melts. Remove from oven and cut into wedges. Serve with sour cream and salsa. Or just stand over the stove and devour.

 

Country-Fried Wild Venison Steak Sandwich

Courtesy of Harvesting Nature

Two halves of a venison sandwich [Image: harvestingnature.com/2015/02/11/country-fried-wild-venison-steak-sandwich]

Image: harvestingnature.com

Is carmelizing the onions completely necessary? Yes. This is the kind of recipe that the next day, you find yourself making again under the premise that “you just have to use of up the rest of that horseradish sauce.” If you’re concerned about the lack of veggies, top your venison with a healthy bunch of baby kale greens.

Ingredients

Carmelized Onions

  • 1 onion, peeled and cut into long slivers
  • 1 teaspoon of olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Horseradish Cream Sauce

  • 4 tablespoons sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
  • 1 tablespoon minced chives
  • Salt & pepper, to taste

Country-Fried Venison Steaks

  • 1 lb venison steaks
  • 2 sandwich buns or 4 pieces of Texas toast
  • ½ cup milk
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 3 cups flour
  • Salt & pepper, to taste
  • Cajun seasoning
  • 1 tablespoon butter, at room temperature
  • Oil, for frying
  • 8 slices of white cheddar cheese

Directions

  1. To prepare the carmelized onions, heat a wide thick-bottomed pot or pan to medium heat. Add olive oil, heat for 1 minute, and then add onions. Cook onions for 10 minutes, occasionally stirring. Add salt and cook additional 30 minutes, stirring regularly. Once onions are carmelized, turn off heat and set aside.
  2. While onions are carmelizing, mix sour cream, horseradish, and chives together in a small bowl. Season the horseradish cream sauce with salt and black pepper to taste.
  3. To make the steaks, begin heating oil in a pan over medium-high heat.
  4. One by one, place steaks in a ziplock bag and with a meat mallet, pound down to approximately ¼” thickness. (After this, you may need to cut the steaks in half for ease of battering and frying.)
  5. Season steaks with salt, black pepper and Cajun seasoning.
  6. On a shallow dish, mix beaten egg and milk.
  7. On another shallow dish, mix together flour, salt, pepper, and Cajun seasoning.
  8. Dip each steak into the flour, then submerge into the egg wash, and finally dredge back into the flour.
  9. Place the battered steak into the heated oil. Flip steak once to ensure both sides are properly golden brown. Remove the steak from the oil and place on a towel.
  10. Evenly disperse the cheese amongst the steaks, and top steaks with carmelized onions.
  11. Cut buns in half (if applicable) and cover the inside and outside with butter. Toast each side of the bun/bread. Coat the inside of the buns with horseradish sauce.
  12. Place the venison and carmelized onions within the buns and enjoy!

4 Recipes Worthy of Your Ice Fishing Catch

It may have taken you all day to land that fish, and you’re tired of the same old baked-fish-with-cracker-crust routine. Honor your day’s ice fishing catch with one of these four delicious but simple recipes that are sure to wow fishing buds and family alike.

Walleye Dip

Courtesy of Shel Zolkewich

A plate of walleye fish dip

Image: www.shelzolkewich.com

Inspired by a dish served at the Shining Falls Lodge in Manitoba, we agree with Shel Zolkewich that this appetizer is seriously something special. If making for a group, be sure to get your fill because it’s sure to disappear lightening-fast!

Ingredients

  • 2 walleye filets
  • ½ teaspoons dried dill (or 2 teaspoons fresh dill)
  • 3 – 4 whole peppercorns
  • 1 8-ounce package cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon hot sauce
  • 1 teaspoon chipotle hot sauce
  • 1 tablespoon fresh chives, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped
  • ½ lemon

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. In a small frying pan, poach filets in 1 cup of water seasoned with dill and peppercorns for about 4 minutes. When done poaching, fish will be white. Remove fish from water and let dry on a plate covered with a paper towel.
  3. Combine softened cream cheese, cheddar cheese, mayonnaise, hot sauces, parsley and chives. Mix well. Mix in fish. Pour mixture into glass pie plate.
  4. Bake dip mixture for 10 – 15 minutes. If you prefer the top of the dip to be crispy, broil for an additional 5 minutes.
  5. Remove dip from oven, and squeeze lemon over the top. Serve with hard crackers or torn bread.

Lake Erie Perch Chowder

Courtesy of Hank Shaw at Hunter * Angler * Gardener * Cook

A bowl of perch chowder with kielbasa

Image: Holly A. Heyser

We confess: We love all of Hank’s recipes. This chowder recipe that he came up with is especially delicious because it’s got that bite of kielbasa in it. This recipe serves 8 – 10.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 large yellow or white onion, chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 1 ½ pounds Yukon Gold or other waxy potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 quart of fish or clam stock
  • 2 cups water
  • ½ teaspoon marjoram
  • Salt & black pepper
  • 1 ½ pounds skinless yellow perch fillets, cut into chunks
  • 6 – 8 ounces Polish kielbasa, sliced
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh dill or parsley
  • 1 cup sour cream, served tableside

Directions

  1. In a Dutch oven or other heavy pot, melt butter over medium heat. When it stops frothing, add onion and cook gently until soft and translucent.
  2. Add the potatoes and coat with butter. Cook 1 – 2 minutes to let the butter absorb. Sprinkle potatoes with salt.
  3. Add stock, water, and marjoram to pot. Add salt and pepper to taste. Simmer gently for about 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender.
  4. Once potatoes are tender, add perch and kielbasa. Simmer another 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and add the fresh dill or parsley.
  5. Ladle chowder into bowls and let everyone add sour cream to taste at the table. Serve with plenty of beer and crusty bread.

Baked Stuffed Pike

Courtesy of Linda Gabris at Western Sportsman

A headless stuffed pike cooked in tin foil

Image: www.foodnetworkrecipes101.com

If you’re not catching pike, this recipe also works for trout, walleye, or salmon. If you’re cooking any fish smaller than 6lbs, adjust the amount of stuffing accordingly.

Ingredients

  • 6 lbs whole dressed Pike (if you prefer, remove head and tail)
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Nutty Rice Stuffing

  • 1 cup wild rice, cooked according to package instructions
  • ½ cup fine breadcrumbs
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons finely diced celery
  • ¼ cup sliced green onions
  • ¼ cup ground almonds
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest
  • 1 tablespoon fresh basil, minced

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, mix together cooked rice, breadcrumbs, celery, green onions, almonds, lemon, zest, and basil.
  2. If cooking at home, preheat oven to 350°F. If cooking outside, stoke campfire so it burns hot and has plenty of hot embers.
  3. Lightly stuff your dressed fish with the rice stuffing. Place remaining stuffing on bottom of baking pan or, if outdoors, on a large sheet of buttered aluminum foil. Lay fish on top of stuffing. Dot fish with remaining butter.
  4. If cooking at home, cover baking pan with a lid and bake fish in the oven for 40 minutes. If cooking over a campfire, securely wrap fish in foil and place over embers, turning often until fish is flaky (about 40 minutes).
  5. When done baking, slip off skin from fish and discard. Garnish fish with lemons and dill.

Grilled Trout with Clementine, Scallion & Ginger

Courtesy of Food for Hunters

A grilled trout rests on clementine slices on a white plate

Image: foodforhunters.blogspot.com

What we love about this Asian-inspired recipe is that you can make it right out on the ice. Just remember to bring along the grill! We recommend preparing the scallion & ginger sauce at home, so you can be eating gourmet in the great outdoors in no time. This recipe serves 2.

Ingredients

  • 2 whole pan-sized trout, scaled and gutted
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • 2 green onions, 1 chopped and 1 sliced in half lengthwise
  • Oil, for brushing
  • 1 clementine orange (or tangerine), peeled and segmented

Ginger Scallion Sauce

  • 2 tablespoons of peanut oil
  • 3 green onions, white and green parts minced
  • 1 tablespoon of fresh ginger, minced
  • ¼ cup of low sodium soy sauce
  • ¼ teaspoon of sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon of rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon of white sugar
  • 1 Thai (bird’s eye) chili, thinly sliced

Directions

  1. Prepare grill to high heat. In a small saucepan, combine peanut oil, minced green onions and green ginger. Warm up mixture for a few minutes, but make sure not to brown it. Pour green onion mixture jar into a small glass jar. Add soy sauce, sesame oil, rice vinegar, sugar, and Thai chili to the mixture in the glass jar. Shake well and set sauce aside for later use.
  2. Rinse trout under cold water and pat dry. Brush the skin and cavity with oil, and sprinkle lightly with salt. Stuff the fish with clementine wedges, sliced green onion, and a drizzle of that ginger scallion sauce you prepared. Note: For the clementine wedges, make sure to peel the skin off each slice so the wedges release more juices during grilling.
  3. Clean grill grates. Brush oil over grates, so the trout won’t stick to them. Place stuffed trout over the grates and cook for 3 – 5 minutes on each side until cooked through and slightly charred. Note: Depending on the size of your fish and how well your grill conducts heat, cooking time may vary.
  4. Transfer cooked fish to plates. Drizzle with more ginger scallion sauce and garnish with chopped green onion.

Looking for more great fish recipes? We’ve amassed quite a delicious collection on our Trophy Case® Fish Recipes Pinterest board!

Attend a Fish & Wildlife Hunting Workshop

With Fall bowhunting and muzzleloader seasons here at last, you won’t want to miss a hunting workshop near you that will help you get the most out of the season. Check out this list of hunting workshops hosted by Fish & Wildlife divisions countrywide.

Two hunters return from hunting in the woods

Image: www.pbase.com

Alabama

STEP OUTSIDE Youth Dove Hunts
October 4 & 11 (Washington)
October 18 & 25 (Monroe)

Dove hunting is a great way to introduce hunting to young adults. Sponsored by the Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division of the Alabama Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources, these hunts work in cooperation with landowners, volunteers, business and organizations to provide an educational hunting program for youth. Registration for this hunting workshop is open to hunters under 16 years old, but they must be accompanied by an adult of at least 25 years old or a parent with a valid state hunting license. Participants are encouraged to wear eye protection and ear plugs at the dove hunts.

New Hampshire

Wild Game, From Field to Table
October 8, 2014
7PM

Love the hunt, but not a fan of the taste? As part of their Outdoor Adventure Talks series, the New Hampshire Fish and Game is presenting a FREE seminar with master game chef Denny Corriveau, Founder of the Free Range Culinary Institute about how to prepare the best-tasting game dishes. Chef Corriveau removes the mystery surrounding cooking wild game, and will show you important techniques that will greatly improve flavor. Part of this seminar includes a hands-on cooking demonstration. You don’t want to miss this hunting workshop!

Calling All Whitetails/Firearms Season Tactics
October 15, 2014
7PM

Another edition of the NH Fish and Game Outdoor Adventure Talks series, this FREE workshop will help you prep for this year’s firearms season. Dean Vanier, a Knight Rifles Pro-Staffer and founder of North Woods Hunting Products will reveal all of the whitetail’s superior defense mechanisms and how to read them. Vanier has over 35 years experience scouting whitetails, and will explain when, where and how to use calls and scent to attract deer as well as more information about the three phases of the rut.

Two deer stand in the fog

Image: www.northamericanwhitetail.com

New Jersey

Rockport Pheasant Farm Open House
October 25, 2014
10AM – 3PM

If you’d like to know more about how over 50,000 ring-necked pheasants are raised for New Jersey’s “put and take” hunting, head to Rockport Pheasant Farm’s Open House. This 492-acre facility is operated by the N.J. Division of Fish and Wildlife, and includes a state-of-the-art incubation and brooder building. The open house offers a self-guided tour with Rockport staff on hand at each station to explain the process and answer questions. Pheasants from the farm are released throughout 24 different Wildlife Management Areas in New Jersey.

Oregon

Family Elk Hunting Workshop
October 26, 2014
9AM – 4PM

New to elk hunting? Or just a little rusty on the basics? This FREE family-friendly workshop presented by the Oregon Dept. of Fish & Wildlife is meant for beginners and those wanting to get back into hunting. Focusing on elk, the workshop will cover topics such as biology and behavior, field dressing, hunting strategies, and regulations. Staff will also help participants understand how to choose the right hunting rifle, how to scout, and how to use maps to find hunting territories. There will be a live fire component where participants will be able to try firing a variety of hunting rifles. Scouting will include live demonstrations of how to read animal tracks and follow a blood trail.

The workshop caps at 24 adults and 6 youths over the age of 9, which makes this a great opportunity to interact with other hunters and ask questions. A hunting license is not required to attend the hunting workshop. Lunch will be provided. Make sure to reserve your spot!

Arkansas

Squirrel Hunting for Beginners
October 28, 2014
6:30PM – 7:30PM

Hosted at the Witt Stephens Jr. Central Arkansas Nature Center in Little Rock, this FREE workshop is a great way to introduce kids and first-time hunters to the sport. Squirrel hunting does not require any special or expensive gear, and the season is open for 9 months, making it the perfect sport to hone hunting skills. In this workshop, participants will learn how to hunt for squirrels, firearm safety, where to look for quarry, and savory squirrel recipes. Who knows? You may be the next Mac English! Register at the Nature Center, by calling 501-907-0636. This event is presented by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.