Tag Archives: autumn

Tasty Wild Game Recipes for Fall

As the fall weather makes its chilly descent and hunting season (finally) starts back up, we find ourselves craving some of our favorite wild game recipes. There’s nothing quite like knowing you were involved in the entire process of catching, dressing, and finally cooking your own meal—the joy behind it is, at times, unexplainable. Plus there are no long lines out in the woods. Here are some recipes that we tend to lean toward once fall rears its head. Maybe you’ll find a new favorite among our list!

Grouse Northwoods

Courtesy of Hunter, Angler, Gardener, Cook

Cooked grouse.

Image: http://honest-food.net/

Ingredients  

  • 1.5 cups wild rice
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • 4 grouse skinned breasts
  • Salt
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1-2 pounds fresh mushrooms
  • 2 minced garlic cloves
  • 1 tsp. dried thyme
  • 1 cup fresh cranberries
  • 1/4 cup fruit syrup
  • 1/3 cup cider vinegar

Directions

  • Salt grouse breasts and set aside at room temperature.
  • Simmer 1 cup wild rice in the grouse (or chicken) broth until tender, 20-50 minutes. When rice is done, drain and set aside in covered bowl.
  • Grind remaining wild rice in spice grinder into a powder (larger bits, are fine). Mix with flour and dredge grouse breasts in it.
  • Heat 3 tsp. of butter in large pan and sauté grouse breasts until they are just barely done (about 4 to 5 minutes per side). Set aside.
  • Put remaining butter in pan and turn heat to high. Add mushrooms until sautéed. Sprinkle with salt and add garlic and thyme. Let mushrooms sear for 1-2 minutes until brown.
  • Add cranberries and toss to combine. Cook until they start popping, then add wild rice, vinegar, and fruit syrup. Toss to combine, and serve with the grouse.

Pan Seared Venison with Rosemary and Dried Cherries

Courtesy of Broken Arrow Ranch

Pan seared vension.

Image: http://eat.snooth.com/

Ingredients

  • 1.5 tsp. chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 tsp. coriander seeds
  • 1 large garlic clove
  • 1.5 tsp. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 (1lb) venison boneless loin
  • 1/4 cup dry red wine
  • 1/4 cup dried tart cherries
  • 1/4 cup fat-free beef broth
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tsp. cornstarch
  • 2 tbsp. black-currant jelly

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  • Grind 1 tsp. rosemary with coriander seeds and garlic to make a paste. Stir in 1/2 tsp. olive oil.
  • Pat venison dry and put in bowl, then rub with paste. Season well with pepper. Cover and chill 20 minutes.
  • Add remaining olive oil to hot skillet. Season venison well with salt, then brown both sides (about 6 minutes total).
  • Roast venison until instant-read thermometer inserted diagonally into center registers 125 degrees (about 7 to 10 minutes). Transfer meat to plate and cover with foil.
  • Add wine and cherries to skillet and deglaze by boiling on moderately high heat, stirring and scraping up brown bits.
  • Stir together broth, water, cornstarch, and remaining rosemary in a bowl and add to skillet. Simmer, stirring until thickened for about 5 minutes. Whisk in jelly and salt and pepper to taste.
  • Cut venison into 1/4 inch thick slices and serve with sauce.

Venison Tenderloin

Courtesy of Field & Stream, contributed by Terrace Brennan (chef at Picholine Restaurant and Artisanal Bistro and Wine Bar)

Venison tenderloin.

Courtesy of Travis Rathbone [Image: http://www.fieldandstream.com/]

Ingredients

  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1⁄2 tsp. ground allspice
  • 1⁄4 tsp. ground star anise
  • 1⁄4 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1⁄4 cup and 2 tbsp. canola oil
  • 4 venison tenderloins, 6–7 oz. each
  • 1⁄4 cup (packed) prunes, chopped in 1⁄4 inch pieces
  • 2 tbsp. Armagnac (optional)
  • 12 tbsp. softened unsalted butter, cut in tablespoon-size pieces
  • 2 cups peeled cheese pumpkin, cut in 1⁄4 inch dice
  • 10 minced sage leaves

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Stir together 1-1⁄2 tsp. salt, 1⁄2 tsp. pepper, allspice, star anise, and cinnamon in bowl. Whisk in 2 tbsp. of oil. Rub mixture on both sides of each venison loin.
  •  Put prunes in another bowl. If using Armagnac, pour over prunes and set aside to soak.
  • Heat 2 tbsp. oil and 2 tbsp. butter in sauté pan over medium heat. Add pumpkin and cook, tossing and stirring every few minutes until lightly caramelized on all sides (about 15 to 18 minutes). Toss in prunes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Put 2 tbsp. of oil and butter in 12 inch ovenproof sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add venison loins when butter starts to sizzle and foam. Sear for 1 minute.
  • Turn loins over and transfer pan to oven. Roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted to the center of loin reads 120 degrees for rare. Remove pan from oven and let venison rest on clean, dry surface for 3 to 4 minutes.
  • Heat sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add remaining butter and cook until it melts and turns brown (about 1 minute).
  • Remove pan from heat and stir in sage leaves. Set sage leaves aside once crispy.
  • Divide pumpkin and prunes evenly around plates. Top each portion with venison loin, drizzle of brown butter, and crisped sage.

Ducks in the Orchard

Courtesy of Hunter, Angler, Gardener, Cook

Cooked duck.

Image: http://honest-food.net/

Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 lbs. duck breast
  • 1 tbsp. duck fat or butter
  • 2 firm apples
  • 1 lemon
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 tbsp. brown sugar or maple sugar
  • Cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 cup apple cider
  • 2 tbsp. finely chopped mint
  • Hawaiian red salt or coarse sea salt

Directions

  • Salt duck breasts lightly. Let sit at room temperature for 25 minutes.
  • Squeeze lemon juice into bowl of water. Slice apples into quarter slices (about 1/4 inch thick) and put in lemon juice. Coat all sides.
  • Heat large sauté pan over high heat. Add duck fat or butter and coat the pan. Place duck breasts skin side down, turn heat to medium, and cook for 5 to 8 minutes until golden brown. Remove duck breasts and tent loosely with foil.
  • Spoon off all but about 3 tbsp. of fat. Cook apples over medium-high heat. Brown apples lightly on both sides.
  • Sprinkle brown sugar over everything and swirl to combine while apples continue to cook for 1 to 2 minutes. Pour cider in pan and put heat up high. Sprinkle a pinch of salt and cayenne into pan. Boil down by 2/3.
  • Slice duck breast pieces roughly the same width as apples.
  • Make rosette of alternating duck breast and apple in center of plate. Spoon small amount of reduced cider on each piece of duck and one more spoonful in center of rosette. Sprinkle with fresh mint and Hawaiian red salt.

Warm Your Belly with these Fall Fish Recipes

Fall cooking means savory, rich, and delicious meals that warm you up against the autumn chills that are starting to creep around. Here are three unique fall fish recipes to use to prepare your latest catch!

Cedar Smoked Maple Salmon

Courtesy of The World Fishing Network

A piece of salmon cooking on a barbecue plank.

Image: http://www.worldfishingnetwork.com/

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp. maple sugar (or brown sugar)
  • 2 tbsp. soy sauce (natural brew)
  • 1 clove minced garlic
  • 1/4 tsp. ground black pepper
  • 2 servings of salmon with skin
  • 2 cedar planks soaked between 2 hrs and 24 hrs

Directions

  • Mix maple syrup, soy sauce, garlic, and pepper.
  • Add salmon and rub it down. Let stand for 1 to 2 hrs.
  • Heat barbecue and lay soaked planks facedown. Leave for 3 minutes or until it starts to smoke, then turn over.
  • Add oil to board then add salmon.
  • Sprinkle salmon with maple sugar.
  • Close barbecue lid and cook for 15 minutes (depends on thickness of salmon).

Cedar-Roasted Char

Courtesy of Field & Stream, contributed by Jeff McInnis (chef at Yardbird Southern Table & Bar in Miami Beach)

Cedar-roasted char.

Image: http://www.fieldandstream.com/

  • 6 Arctic char fillets, approx. 5 oz. each
  • Kernels from 15 ears of fresh corn
  • 1⁄2 cup champagne
  • 6 tbsp. unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 1 cup diced carrots
  • 3 ears corn on the cob
  • 2 cups baby lima beans
  • 1⁄4 cup plus 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 cup thinly sliced leeks, white part only
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 1 large tomato, seeded and diced small
  • Salt to taste
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste

Directions

Make the sauce.

  • Place corn kernels in a blender and puree about a minute until very smooth. Pour puree into a bowl through a fine-mesh sieve.
  • Press on pulp to extract as much juice as possible then discard pulp.
  • Add corn juice and champagne to a small saucepan over medium-high heat.
  • Cook, stirring constantly, for about 3 minutes or until it thickens almost to the consistency of pudding. (Sauce at bottom may appear slightly scorched; keep stirring.)
  • Reduce the heat to low and stir in the butter one piece at a time to form a silky sauce.
  • Remove from heat; the natural cornstarch will thicken.
  • Season with salt and pepper, and set aside.

Make the succotash.

  • Bring large pot of water to a boil over high heat.
  • Add carrots, and cook for approx. 3 minutes or until tender.
  • Transfer to a bowl of ice water.
  • Add corn, and remove when water returns to a boil in approx. 3 minutes.
  • Set corn aside and add lima beans to same water.
  • Reduce heat to low, and simmer for 10 minutes or until tender.
  • Drain, and set lima beans aside.
  • Cut kernels off corncobs and discard cobs.
  • Heat 1⁄4 cup olive oil in a large, shallow saucepan over medium-high heat.
  • Add leeks and sauté for few minutes.
  • Tie up the bay leaf with thyme sprigs like a bouquet using butcher twine. Add to pan.
  • Add reserved carrots, lima beans, and corn along with the tomatoes.
  • Season generously with salt and pepper.
  • Cook for approx. 2 minutes or until just warmed through.
  • Remove herbs, cover, and remove from heat.

Cook the fish.

  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  • Lightly oil fillets with remaining 2 tbsp. olive oil, and season with salt and pepper.
  • Place fish on a thin cedar plank and bake for 7 to 9 minutes depending on thickness.
  • To serve, spoon a generous portion of succotash onto the plates, top with the fish, and torch.
  • Brush each fillet with the corn sauce. Using a kitchen torch, lightly brown the sauce as you would a crème brûlée. Alternatively, brush the fillets with corn sauce while they’re still on the plank and place them under a broiler very close to the heat. Remove when sauce has browned.

Walleye Wild Rice Cakes with Wasabi Dressing

Courtesy of Midwest Living

Walleye Wild Rice Cakes with Wasabi Sauce.

Image: http://www.midwestliving.com/

Ingredients

  • 8 oz. skinned walleye
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 lightly beaten egg
  • 1 cup panko bread crumbs
  • 1/2 cup cooked wild rice
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
  • 2 tbsp. finely chopped red sweet pepper
  • 2tbsp. canola oil mayonnaise or regular mayonnaise
  • 1tbsp. Dijon-style mustard
  • 1tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
  • 1tsp. lemon juice
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. ground black pepper
  • 2tbsp. canola oil
  • 1/4 cup canola oil mayonnaise or regular mayonnaise
  • 1/2 tsp. lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp. prepared wasabi paste
  • 1/2 tsp. sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. soy sauce
  • Salt to taste
  • Ground black pepper to taste
  • Mixed greens (optional)

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  • In a 2-quart baking dish, pour wine over fish.
  • Bake uncovered for 4 to 6 minutes per 1/2-inch thickness of fish until fish flakes when tested with a fork. Drain and break into pieces.
  • In medium bowl, combine fish, egg, panko, cooked wild rice, onion, red sweet pepper, 2 tbsp. mayonnaise, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, 1 tsp. lemon juice, 1/4 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. pepper.
  • Shape mixture into 6 3/4-inch thick patties (about 1/3 cup each).
  • Place patties on a baking sheet, cover, and chill for 2 hrs.
  • In 12-inch skillet, heat canola oil over medium heat. Add patties to skillet and cook 10 minutes or until golden brown, turning once.

Make wasabi dressing.

  • In small bowl, combine 1/4 cup mayonnaise, 1/2 tsp. lemon juice, wasabi paste, sugar, and soy sauce.
  • Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Serve cakes with dressing on a bed of greens, if desired.